11.20.2014

because who doesn't love lists


THINGS I LOVE ABOUT BEING HOME:

oklahoma sunrises
telling stories from England
breakfast with my family
making plans
going through all my England pictures
my momma's cooking


I DIDN'T KNOW I MISSED:

waving at strangers without getting weird looks
working at my desk
working on my floor
making my family laugh
looking out my window
driving
my bookshelves


WHAT I MISS ABOUT ENGLAND:

my people
walking everywhere
being so close to big ben
crispy duck with plum sauce
dance parties in the kitchen
the fireplace
reading to lil' Adelaide
how intensely green it is


WHAT I DON'T MISS ABOUT ENGLAND:

the power outlets. ugh.


PHRASES/WORDS I PICKED UP FROM THE BRITS:

rubbish
giddy
oh yeah, roy
fair enough
cheers
motorway
diddy
cheeky


HOW I'VE CHANGED:

I take and share ugly selfies without shame.
I drink my tea with plenty of milk and no sugar.
I eat using both a fork and knife.
I have a drastically different hairstyle (which I love).
I possess a more straightforward outlook on life.
I pray a lot more than I used to.
I have an easier time saying "Yes, Lord."
Change doesn't scare me anymore.
Not much of anything scares me anymore.


HOW I'M CURRENTLY OCCUPYING MY TIME:

editing my England photos
planning an England photobook
working my way through The Count of Monte Cristo
experimenting with black-out poetry
planning furniture refurb projects
playing piano like mad after being deprived for three months
catching up with friends
studying the Word, both solo and with my family
practicing photography


LOOKING FORWARD TO:

next week when a whole bunch of family comes to visit
Thanksgiving food
making British desserts for our holiday menus
blaring Christmas music
traveling more (no plans yet, just praying)
adjusting to new changes

--

p.s. before I left England, Jess and I made one final wrap-up video. it's weird and we're strange, but you can watch it here, if you like, and then indulge in the bloopers.

18 comments:

  1. I laughed at your 'british' words list. 'Rubbish' is very British. I never realised it before, haha.

    I enjoyed this post. Yes, we all love lists. :-)

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  2. Lists are wonderful. I loved number six. My favorite part of traveling has always been coming home a little bit different.

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  3. love that first picture!! oh, drinking tea with half a cow now are we? haha ALL THE UGLY SELFIES. also. thanksgiving. food. food. thanksgiving.

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  4. lists are really the bee's knees.
    i love this!

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  5. I love your list of British words! I find myself using "rubbish" more than ever with all my BBC watching, and "cheeky" always makes me think of Mary Poppins. :)

    Lists always make me happy. I very much enjoyed reading yours! :)

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  6. Love all the lists! And the pictures...so beautiful! The one of Adelaide is my favorite. :)
    And I love the first one....so neat seeing a "behind the scenes" of your blog header! (that's what it is, right?) I want to try a watercolor blog header sometime. So pretty.
    And oh! I can TOTALLY relate about being piano deprived for 3 months!! I recently moved and that's about how long I had to live without a piano...maybe longer. It was hard. I was SO happy to finally get a new piano (even though I missed my old one..sob..) What's wrong with the electrical outlets in England, if I may ask?

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    1. yes, indeed! that was the day Jess and I (well, mostly Jess, haha) re-designed my blog. :)
      oh man, the power outlets there are just so weird. they're huge and oddly shaped and the cord sticks out the bottom instead of the side like American ones (which makes it difficult to plug into outlets that are close to the floor, which a lot of them are). and then, after you plug it in, you have to turn on a little switch on the outlet. so when you unplug it, you have to remember to turn the switch off. it may sound petty, but compared to American outlets, they're just kind of a pain, haha. :P

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    2. Hey Petie,
      You mean, you don't have to turn the switch off in America? we have the switch in Aus too!

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    3. Petie~ Wow so weird! It's funny learning little tidbits about life in other countries. Never would have guessed. Thanks for explaining that. :)
      Evie~ In America, there is no switch! Just a plug that you plug the cord into or pull it out of. I've never heard of outlets with switches on them...haha, so funny! Are they a pain to you? :)

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    4. Hey Natalie! :-)
      Um what?! sorry just my brain is hurting thinking about that. That's actually pretty funny and somtimes.. but I like them. You have to be careful though when you pull out that the switch is off.. or its off when yooou plug in.. plenty of sparks and a big bang happen... I know from experiance....

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    5. Wow, really? That must be scary when you forget to switch it off!
      Haha, I can see where outlets with no switches would be mind boggling to you. Just as ones with switches are hard for me to imagine too! :) Hopefully you can come to America sometime and see the outlets, haha! ;) ~Natalie

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  7. I love lists! And your last list just made me happy/excited for the holidays!
    And you and Jess are just so hilarious and great. :)

    Blessings!

    -Madi

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  8. I have borrowed sort of British sounding words (what I think are anyway) from reading like brilliant, but we say fair enough (as a concession to an argument or admission of the logic or justice of something). Does it mean something different there? Is waving at people rude there? I think it may be just a Southern-Midwestern thing in the U.S. because I am pretty sure Northerners do not like friendly people or eye contact from stories I have heard. I love learning all sorts of differences in word and manner (like personal space, what is considered timely) and taking word choice quizzes to determine which area of the country I speak like.

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    1. "Fair enough" is just used a lot more over there than it is here. They use it when we would say, "Oh, okay," or "That's understandable." At first I thought it was just a quirk of the family I was staying with, but the more British people I met, the more I realized it's a common British phrase. :)
      And yes, waving to strangers is considered weird, rude, or forward there. So strange! Especially for a southerner like me. ;)

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    2. Waving to strangers? They do that in America?

      Squee, it's so funny how countries are so different. :-)

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  9. It's funny, the things you miss, isn't it. A lot of those phrases you picked up in England are actually NZ too...
    About eating with a fork and knife...my best friend is American and her family usually only eat with forks so when I go there I ask for a knife:-D It's weird, the little things that are different!

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Your comments are the sugar to my iced tea. Which means they make my day.